Calling all cyclists! I need your help!

Discussion in 'Off-Topic' started by minnesotanice, Nov 30, 2020.

  1. minnesotanice
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    minnesotanice Active Member

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    Hello! First off, I'm relatively new to biking. I bought a used 29er over the summer to help get me out of the house and get some exercise. With the cold (more so the darkness) that exists in our state, I haven't been able to ride as of late and want to keep riding through the winter in my garage on a trainer.

    The trainer that I have fits my bike by millimeter (singular) and when I started riding on it, I notice a rubbery smell. I also know that riding on knobby tires on trainers isn't ideal due to noise and wear, so in an effort to make things a bit easier, I want to get a tire that I can ride on the trainer, then swap back out when spring comes around.

    Is there anything specific to look for outside of a smoother tire? Do they sell more commuter style tires for wheels this size?

    Specs on my bike:
    2014 Specialized Stumpjumper hardtail
    29x2.3 tires with tubeless set up
    Unknown aftermarket crank (bought it used)

    Thanks for any input!
     
  2. Krazylegz1485
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    Krazylegz1485 Well-Known Member

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    I'm by far not an expert in this area, but I can at least tell you what I've got going on.

    I've got a Trek Marlin and the "normal" tires are Bontrager XR2, 29x2.00.

    I picked up a trainer last year when I got the bike (basically at Thanksgiving, so couldn't even ride it right away unless I got the trainer) and the wife picked me up a "street" tire from the shop where we got the bike from. It made a significant difference in noise and was definitely nicer to ride "on" with the trainer.

    Anywho, it's also a Bontrager. Looks like the "model" is H5 and the size is 700x45. I'm guessing that's metric and the other is standard? It's got a significantly narrower width and required a different tube size as well. Definitely worth it, tho.

    Also, I'd recommend getting some of the little plastic tire changer "pry bars" if you don't have them already. I'd have to look up what brand mine are again, but they make swapping the tires insanely easy.

    Link to the tools: https://www.amazon.com/50-Strong-Bi...uPWNsaWNrUmVkaXJlY3QmZG9Ob3RMb2dDbGljaz10cnVl
     
    Last edited: Nov 30, 2020
  3. Chin
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    Chin Well-Known Member

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    I am running the Continental Hometrainer tire...but I ride 26". The heat associated with trainers is why a trainer tire is recommended over a road/gravel tire. I am not sure how much of an issue it is, but something to consider.

    Looks like there is a 29" tire...Tacx Trainer
     
  4. euro
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    euro Well-Known Member

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    They make some trainer specific tires that are harder and treadless. I used to roast tires on my mountain bike and bmx race bikes and leave black rubber dust everywhere
     
  5. minnesotanice
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    minnesotanice Active Member

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    I saw the Tacx Trainer but I have reservations given it is a 1.25" tire width, I don't think that would fit would it? Not without some major hotboi stretch?
     
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  6. Chin
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    Chin Well-Known Member

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    Well, I avoided the 'tubeless' discussion...that just makes everything more difficult. I don't expect that width will be an issue...they are designed for 29" MTB. Unless, of course, you are using some crazy wide rim (but I don't expect a 2.3" is). Of course it is a 'stretch', but what's the problem? This is only to be ridden on the trainer...width is not your friend on a trainer.
     
  7. Chin
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    Chin Well-Known Member

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    Vittoria appears to have one:
    Vittoria Zaffiro

    Not a trainer tire, but slick:
    WTB ThickSlick
     
  8. loxx0050
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    loxx0050 Well-Known Member

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    Get a trainer specific tire as other have suggested as they are designed for the extra heat/wear that is generated. Plus the smoother profile reduces noise and vibrations significantly ona a trainer. It doesn't matter how wide or narrow the tires you use on a trainer as long as it fits the rim and holds air. You aren't going anywhere literally on the thing so it's not a safety issue. If you can't find one just find the cheapest smooth tread tire that will fit your wheel.

    Also, trainer tires are much harder to mount onto rims. Heating them up slightly in the clothes dryer helps a bit to soften it up just enough. Or just get a Kool Stop Bead Jack (these things will save your knuckles/fingers trying to install these things). I've had a heck of a time in the past try to mount trainer tires with just a set of tire irons (have never been successful getting these on by hand personally). Heating it up a bit helped a little...but that bead jack was so much easier I wish I'd bought one sooner.

    https://www.amazon.com/dp/B001AYML7K/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_fabc_9.-XFbXPTVN8F

    Honestly I'd just recommend finding a cheap used rear wheel to have the trainer tire permanently mounted to. Doesn't need to have a disc brake rotor attached (if thats the style brakes your bike has) since you don't need brakes on a trainer. That's what I used to run when I had an "wheels on" trainer. Made it easier to swap quickly to go riding outside. You do need another cassette though on that spare wheel. I ruined a few inner tubes swapping trainer tire to regular road tires back and forth (have clincher wheels/tires). Enough of a hassle I was willing to fork over some money for a spare wheel to swap out relatively quickly.
     
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  9. loxx0050
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    loxx0050 Well-Known Member

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    Oh and one more thing, a 29er wheel rim is practically the same diameter as a 700c wheel typical for road bike rims. So a 700c trainer specific tire may actually fit on your bike's 29er rear wheel. You might want to buy a smaller tube for it though instead of the one that came in your current wheel/tire combo (if you are installing it on that for now). Different volume so it might be tough to reuse your existing inner tube (if it has one) in there without the risk of a pinch flat.
     
  10. minnesotanice
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    minnesotanice Active Member

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    I ended up calling Chilkoot and Gateway to discuss with them options yesterday. I ended up getting a 700x35c trainer tire along with some tubes and tools. The plan is to take off my current tubeless tire, clean up the rim and put on the trainer and tube set up for the winter. When warmer weather comes around, I will swap back to the tubeless set up when it becomes necessary.
     
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