New owner, toasted motor

Discussion in 'The Welcome Mat' started by starspangled6.0, Oct 10, 2018.

  1. starspangled6.0
    Offline

    starspangled6.0 New Member

    Likes Received:
    5
    Trophy Points:
    3
    What's up fellow Minny-sotans! Just had a friend drop off a 2003 Impreza Outback at my house. He gave it to me for $500, but the motor is kaput. Makes an unholy rattle and knock. It has around 140k miles on it.

    The other forums I'm on tell me to just buy a used motor - thoughts on this vs rebuilding it? I've been involved in mechanics for the past 12 years, but haven't ever swapped or rebuilt a motor. My gut reaction is to get all crazy and see how much HP is possible from an EJ25 (that's the correct engine, right?), but I think I should just see if I can get it running again and go from there. Any and all advice is appreciated. Chevy trucks are way more my speed, but I've always been a Subaru fan, and who doesn't need another project car :) ?
     
    tangledupinblu likes this.
  2. Krazylegz1485
    Offline

    Krazylegz1485 Well-Known Member

    Likes Received:
    1,932
    Trophy Points:
    248
    Save yourself the almost guaranteed disappointment and just find a known working, used engine and just swap it out. You surely can rebuild but your end cost would be much higher. And then if you're shooting for power? Best of luck to ya.

    If money is no object and you're doing this for fun/out of boredom, go nuts and take pics along the way.
     
  3. curly2k3
    Offline

    curly2k3 Well-Known Member

    Likes Received:
    657
    Trophy Points:
    348
    More power and looking to swap the engine possibly anyway? LS swap ftw.
     
    Krazylegz1485 and GotGrip? like this.
  4. Eazy_E_Rich
    Offline

    Eazy_E_Rich Well-Known Member

    Likes Received:
    393
    Trophy Points:
    148
    I'll just leave this here then...
     
  5. Mnelson
    Offline

    Mnelson Active Member

    Likes Received:
    317
    Trophy Points:
    73
    Everyone already said it but a known working engine swap is pretty much the way to go unless you hate money. The cost grows exponentially as soon as you split the block. Mostly because head bolts (and I believe case bolts) are torque to yield and aren't really cheap.

    If you want something faster, eazys H6 swap is an awesome template to follow. Watch it regardless of what you do. That or swap a bugeye wrx drive train into it.
     
    Last edited: Oct 10, 2018
    Eazy_E_Rich and tangledupinblu like this.
  6. starspangled6.0
    Offline

    starspangled6.0 New Member

    Likes Received:
    5
    Trophy Points:
    3

    My younger self would have vowed to make it the biggest, baddest Subie in MN. My older self though... he recognizes the limited amount of time I have each week to work on this. Given that it's my first motor swap, I think staying stock will be my best choice. Might put some new injectors and a bigger turbo on my diesel Cruze, though... :)
     
    Aegis and tangledupinblu like this.
  7. idget
    Offline

    idget Want to pokéman? PM ShortytheFirefighter Staff Member

    Likes Received:
    4,097
    Trophy Points:
    398
    NA motor swap is really straightforward and everything is easily accessible (compared to the turbo motors anyway). Might be worth spending an extra couple hundred bucks on a longblock (or whatever you can find that's as close to fully assembled) to save some time and money (mostly gaskets but I'm sure some hoses as well).
     
    drac77 likes this.
  8. starspangled6.0
    Offline

    starspangled6.0 New Member

    Likes Received:
    5
    Trophy Points:
    3
    Awesome! Hopefully I can start diving in come November.
     
  9. starspangled6.0
    Offline

    starspangled6.0 New Member

    Likes Received:
    5
    Trophy Points:
    3
    Finally had time yesterday to get it prepped for removal. I'm shocked at how easy it was; 1.5 hours with a friend and it's ready to be pulled. Need to get an engine hoist next and then decide if we'll send it somewhere for a rebuild, or source a used motor.

    Just to be certain - it's an EJ25 engine, correct? Want to make sure I buy the correct replacement before I go shopping.
     
  10. tangledupinblu
    Offline

    tangledupinblu Event Coordinator Staff Member

    Likes Received:
    6,409
    Trophy Points:
    573
    If you are looking for a direct replacement, i’d pull the numbers off of the block once it comes out. There are a handful of variations of the EJ25.

    Looks like the EJ251: source-Wikipedia
    6A2B590C-552D-4C9E-808A-EFA51C53F9D0.png 093C33F5-92F9-4268-8F31-356633920B01.png
     
  11. Mnelson
    Offline

    Mnelson Active Member

    Likes Received:
    317
    Trophy Points:
    73
    You shouldn't have too many issues putting a ej253 long block in an older 251 model as long as the cam/crank gears and intake w/ sensors of the 251 are still used.

    There's also a ej252 used in 01 due to some California regulations where they used the same cam/crank sprockets of a 251 auto on 252 manuals.

    The point of telling you this is that the long block shouldn't matter, just keep everything labeled and put the right cam/crank sprockets for the cars ecu. If you don't, it won't fire and the backfire could cause internal damage.
     
  12. starspangled6.0
    Offline

    starspangled6.0 New Member

    Likes Received:
    5
    Trophy Points:
    3
    Awesome, thanks for the information. Might finish pulling it this week or next week and then the search begins for a donor motor.
     
  13. starspangled6.0
    Offline

    starspangled6.0 New Member

    Likes Received:
    5
    Trophy Points:
    3
    Ha, how time flies by and the car just sits there, waiting to be worked on. Still haven't pulled it, but it's ready to come out now. Wife bought me some a new Milwaukee 1\4" impact and 3\8" power ratchet so I got to try them out on the Subaru. Tonight I removed the A\C compressor, but I was able to keep the hoses attached and it should not be in the way when I pull the motor. I did check the spark plugs just for kicks, and each of them was just over finger-tight. Each of the spark plug boots was coated in what looked like coolant, but the passenger side boots were especially bad. Threads on one of the passenger side plugs was pretty oily, too.

    Next plan is to get a hoist and then pull the heads off to see what kind of carnage took place. I want to see how far I can get into a rebuild... this car has no dollar or practical value to me, but it definitely is a fun project and I'm learning a lot already.

    IMG_0050.jpg
    imagejpeg_0_02.jpg
    20181203_181019.jpg
     
    joebush44 and tangledupinblu like this.
  14. tangledupinblu
    Offline

    tangledupinblu Event Coordinator Staff Member

    Likes Received:
    6,409
    Trophy Points:
    573
    Ewwwww.
     
  15. ShortytheFirefighter
    Offline

    ShortytheFirefighter Pokemans. I has none. Staff Member

    Likes Received:
    1,553
    Trophy Points:
    398
    I know how to fix this so that it'll never happen again...
     
    tangledupinblu likes this.
  16. joebush44
    Offline

    joebush44 Well-Known Member

    Likes Received:
    1,163
    Trophy Points:
    248
    This is the best way to learn! Lots of research and then get in there and tear **** apart. That's how I've always done it lol
     
    tangledupinblu likes this.

Share This Page